Reflections on my Birthday

I recently had a birthday – and next year will be one of the big “Star-Oh” birthdays, you know, 20, 30, 40, 50… I try to reflect back every year, and project forward, something like a retrospective you might encounter after completing a project at work. During this look-around, I think about the lessons I learned over the year, any highlights, and any lowlights. Because I’m not doing this at work, I skip developing a list of any Action Items 😀

Here are some of the lessons I learned this year:

  • I still need to improve my prioritization methods. (I primarily use Dale Carnegie’s Important vs Urgent quadrant and block time on my calendar to execute.) I am good at addressing the highest priority, most urgent items, first. However, I don’t always look ahead with a wide-enough window, and so large projects that are due somewhat soon, but not immediately, get allocated time in a sub-optimal manner. This means I struggle to complete these types of task to my high quality bar, in the little time I have remaining before the item comes due.
  • I need to be more intentional with my hiring. Amazon has trained me to always be hiring, because I’m likely to get headcount for my rapidly-growing team in steady blocks at least once a year, more likely twice, sometimes even four times a year. So if I have a pipeline that I’m curating all year round, I’ll be more successful at filling my projects than if I’m reacting. So while that part’s working well for me, I hired two engineers when I had three positions open up on 1/01. The third position, the project manager, I thought I’d have in the bag since I used to be a TPM! I was mistaken. After moving through my warm-backlog of candidates without finding the right person, I had already hired and started my two engineers, and with the two interns who are also starting soon, I have 4 more engineers’ worth of work on my plate, and no project manager to help split the load. This is the first time I’ve regretted being so successful at hiring, and makes me hesitate to be so enthusiastic about adding engineers, temporary OR full-time, anytime in the near future.
  • I need to coach my team on management tasks earlier and more often. I took a couple of months after joining my current team to figure out who was interested in learning any management skills, and then made sure that these individuals start to develop the personal goals they need to encourage, track, and support their learning in this area. Then I coach them in the skills themselves. In the meantime, I went on to hire more engineers than I could comfortably on-board, without having the task-level and project-level management support available from my more senior engineers, and still with that TPM slot open. While that’s support is coming soon, I’m currently working a bit more than I had imagined, because of the mis-allocation.
  • I need to keep my eyes open more frequently to people’s non-verbal signals, especially when they’re at the front of the pack. I tend to believe leaders: when they say a thing, their words are simply true. I sometimes choose to ignore the non-verbal signals that accompany that signal and make it a bit fuzzier. Leaders don’t get respect just because they’re leaders, they get respect because they’ve earned it. If they haven’t earned it yet with me, personally, I must trust AND verify in order to be sure I’m reading their words, body language, and the situation correctly.

These are the main lessons I’ve learned in the past one-circle-around the sun. Next post, I’ll discuss some highlights and lowlights from the past year!

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